Sunday, May 29, 2011

List: Personal names

When I was researching names for my persona, Ursula George's page and her associated St. Gabriel Report 3315 were the biggest source (all but two from Zgusta's book). Almost all of the names I've read are listed there, but I've come across a few others and wanted to include them in a list here for anyone looking. I've put everything in alphabetical order based on our alphabet rather than the Greek. Read the original report (or Zgusta) if you want to know what the Greek letters were.

As is said in the report, last names often indicate relation to someone else (husband or father). Males simply use the genitive form of their father's name while females use words meaning "wife of" and "daughter of" in addition to the genitive form of their mother or husband's name.

It's also conceivable that if your persona spent a lot of time or was well known among another culture or tribe, they might be known locatively as "Sarmatian/of the Sarmatians" or "<insert tribe name>/of the <insert tribe name> (The former was indicated in the St. Gabriel's report, the latter is my own assertion. EDIT: I've found uses of "So-and-so of the Alans/of Alania in regards to Alanian women married to Georgian kings, so it's definitely an option for a persona in medieval Alania.). 

The third naming option available to much of the SCA is a descriptive last name (job, prominent physical attribute, etc...). I haven't found any precedent for this specifically among Sarmatians, but it's something to think about. EDIT: I've found a use of "the Great" as an epithet for a medieval Alanian king, so that is an option for a medieval Alanian persona (assuming it isn't considered presumptuous).

Most known Sarmatian names were transcribed into Greek (they didn't have a written language of their own), so their naming convention is used. This means they probably aren't exactly the same as what the Sarmatians themselves would have used, but it's what's available to us. Any not recorded in Greek (probably Latin) have an asterisk next to them. Make sure your naming convention for the last name follows the appropriate language or give it in the English form if you aren't sure.

If a name is from a source other than Zgusta, I'll give as much information about it as I can. If you want information on a name from that book (like when the person lived/died) and can't get a copy of it, contact me and I'll check it out from the library as soon as possible. I really wish I could find a copy for sale...

Along with the names themselves, I've listed genitive forms in order to help you with the last name. This list will be updated as I find genitive forms for all the endings. Anyone knowledgeable about Ancient Greek genitives?

Another thing I should note is the intermarriage of Georgians and Alanians in medieval Alania. I've included some names you can find as belonging to Alanians here- only those which cannot trace their male lineage to a source other than the Alans. I haven't included any which are blatantly biblical as opposed to ethnic Alanian (as in Mary of Alania and David Soslan). These seem to pop up when the paternal line is traced back to a male Georgian. I also did not include David's descendants, At'on and Jadaron  of the Osi, or his father, Demetrius, because of their patrilineal origin.  Although they lived among the Ossetians, but I don't know if their names are Ossetian. The names in this paragraph are a viable option for a persona of mixed heritage, the list below is intended for someone who wants to be sure their name is Sarmatian in origin.

Greek genitives
Name endings (original ending first, genitive form second)
-a: 
-as: -a 
-ê: 
-ês:
-is: -ios
-ôn: ônos
-os:  -ou
-us: 

Of the Sarmatians
Male- Saurmatês
Female- Sauromatis

Female-specific
gunê: "wife of"; precedes husband's name
thugatêr: "daughter of"; precedes father's name

Personal names
Female

*Ababa: Recorded by Jordanes. Possibly the Alanic mother of Maximinus Thrax (he was born 172 or 173). His Gothic heritage is disputed (Jordanes thinks the Goths and Getae are the same people and Maximinus was more likely from Thrace). I haven’t found anymore information regarding this name. I’m not sure Jordanes’ information would be considered reliable documentation for passing the name.
*Alda, Alde, Aldi: Recorded by John Skylitzes. Early 11th-century Alanian princess, wife of a Georgian king. Definitely alive from 1027-1033. Info in Alemany (2000) and Tourmanoff (1976).
Amagê: A Sarmatian Queen near the Black Sea in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus. Info in Harmatta (1970). Sulimirski records a Queen Amage of the Roxolani in 165-140 BC. I need to get a copy of Harmatta to look into this temporal disparity because he was definitely talking about the same person.
Aritê
*Borena: Alanian princess, wife of a Georgian king.  Definitely alive from 1030-1072. Info in Garland (2006).
*Burdukhan: Alanian mother of Tamar of Georgia. Late 10th century, definitely alive in 1160. Info in Eastmond (1998).

Leimeiê
Mada
Maiôsara
Sarukê
Storanê
Tamura
Tirgataô: Queen of the Ixomatae in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus.
Male

Abaziôn
Abdarakos
*Abeacus: In Sulimirski. King of the Siraces in the Kuban valley and steppe north of the northwest Caucasus in 66-63 BC.
Aboagos
Abragos
Abrozeos
Adoês
Akasas, Akkas
Aldis
Alexarthos
Amaiakos,Amaeiakos
Amôspados
Andra[n]akos
Aphtheimakos,Aphthaimakos
Apsachos 
Araouê[g]os
Ardagdakos
Ardaros,Ardarakos,Ardariskos
Argamênos
Argouanagos 
Aroasios
Arsaliôn
Arsêouachos,Arsêoachos,Arsêochos
Arttham[ma]nos, Arthiemmanos 
*Asander: From coins Husband of Dynamis. King of Bosporus from 37-17 BC.
Asanos
Asaros
Aspakos
Aspamitharês
Asphôrougos
Aspourgos, *Aspurgus: First spelling from Zgusta, second from coins. Second was King of Bosporus from 8 BC-38 AD.
*Attaces:  King of the Alans in Hispania. Successor of Respendial. Died in 426 AD (Alemany, 2000) or 418 AD (Bury, 1923).
Auasis
Aubadag[-?]
Aunamos
Aurazakos
Azariôn
Azos, Aziagos
Badagos, Badakês, Padagos
Badas
Bagdochos
Bagdosauos
Bagês, Bagios
Baioraspos
Baiormaios
Banas
Bastakas
Baxagos
Bida[k]ês
Bistês
Bôrakos
Boraspos
Bôrnôn
Bôropsazos
Bradakos
Chanakês
Chardeis
Chodainos
Chôdarzos
Chodekios
Chodiakios, Chozi[a]kos
Chodios
Chôdonakos
Chopharnos
Chophrasmos, Chophrazmos
Choroathos, Choroua[thos]
Chouarsazos
Chounaros
Dadagos, Dadakos
Danarasmakos
Dandaxarthos
Didumoxarthos
*Durgolel, Dorgolel: King of medieval Alania in the 11th century. Info in Garland (2006).
Dosumoxarthos
Eisgoudios
Êlmanos
*Eochar: A king of the Alans in 446. May or may not be the same person as Goar. If he isn't a different person, "Eochar" may be an erroneous recording of "Gochar". Info in Alemany (2000).
Êrakas
Eubarnakos
*Eunones: From Sulimirski. King of the Aorsi in the Don-Volga region in 49 AD. Ally of the Romans and of Cotys, the new Bosporan ruler.
*Eupator: Bosporan king on coins from 155-166 AD.
Gadas
Gadikios, Gadikeios
*Galatus:  In Sulimirski. King of the Roxolani in 179 BC

Gaos
Gasteis, Gastein
*Goar, Gochar: A king of the Alans in Gaul. Born before 390 and died sometie between 446 and 450. Info in Alemany (2000).
Gôdigasos
Godosauos
Gôsakos
Gosôn
Iaphagos
Iauakos
Iazad[agos], Iezdagos, Iezdrados
*Ininthimeus: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 235-240 AD.
Insazagos
Iôdas
Iôdesmagos 
Iramboustos
Irauadis
Irbis
Irganos
Kainaxarthos, Kênexarthos
Kamorsazês, Kamarsazês
Karaxstos, Karaxtos, Karastos
Karsas
Karzoazos, Karzouazos
Kasagos, Kasakos
Kasais
Katokas, Kattas, Katiôn
*Khuddan: Alanian king in the 10th century. Info in Eastmond (1998).
Kopharnos
Kossas,Kosous,Kossous,Kousous,Kos[sô]n
[K]ouridatês (-os)
Kouzaios
Madakos, Madôis
Maiakos
Maipharnos
Maisês
Maniagos
Mardauos
Masas
Mastas, Mastous, Mastounos, Mastarous
Mazis, Mazous
Medosaccus: Husband of Amagê. King of Sarmatians near the Black Sea in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus.
Megis
Mêthakos, Mêsakos
Meuakos
Mordos
Mourdagos
Nabazos
Namgênos
Namouchos
Nauakos, Nauagos
Oaroz[b]alakos
Ocho[a]rzanês
Olgasus
Omrasmakos
Orsiomichos
Ossi[gas?]os
Ouachôza[k]os, Ochôdiakos, Ochôziakos
Ouag[a]sis
Ouaras
Ouarazakos
Ouarzbalos
Ouastobalos
Ourbazos
Ourgios
Ousigasos, Ousigos
Oustanos
Ouzia[g]os
Oxardôzis
Pagos
Parspanakos
Pateiros
Pateis, Patias
Pêrakos
Phadinamos, Phazinamos
Phadious, Phazious
Phaldaranos
Phandarazos
Pharnagos, Pharnakês, Pharnakiôn
Pharnarnos
Pharnês
Pharnoxarthos
*Pharsanzes: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 253-254 AD.
Phidas,Phidanous,Phêdanakos,Pidos,Pideis,Pidanos
Phleimnagos,Phlimanakos,Leimanos,Limnakos
Phlianos
Phodakos
Phorêranos
Phorgabakos
Phoriauos
Phoros
Phosakos
Phourtas
Pitopharnakês, Pitpharnakês, Phitopar[nakês?]
Pourthaios, Pourthais, Pourthakês
Radamasis
[R]adameistos
Radamophourtos
Radamphôn
Radampsôn, Radanpsôn
Radamsadios, Radamps[adios]
Raodmêos
Rapakês
Rass[o]gos
Rathagôsos
*Respendial: A king of the Alans in Gaul. Birth and death dates unknown, but definitely alive between 406 and 409 AD. Had been succeeded by 426 AD (Alemany, 2000) or 418 AD (Bury, 1923).
*Rhadamsades: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 308-323 AD.
*Rhescuporis: From coins. Several kings of Bosporus bore this name from 68-342 AD.
Sadimanos
Saitapharnês
*Sambida: A king of the Alans in Valentia in 440. Recorded in Chronica Galla of 452.
Sanagos
*Sangiban : Jordanes records this as the name of the king of the Alani at the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains (451 AD).
Sarakos
Saratos
Saraxazos
Sasas, Sasôn
Sattiôn
Sauagaskos, Sauagas
Sauaiôsos
Sauanôn
*Sauromates: Name born by several members of the Sarmato-Thracian Bosporan dynasty, which ruled from about 33BC to the 4th century AD. Coins with busts of Sauromates I were minted sometime from 90-124 AD. Coins with Sauromates II were minted sometime from 174-211 AD.
Seauagos
Seimeikos
Sênêkas
Siauakos
Siauask[is]
Siauos
Siômachos
Siranos
Sôchoubazos
Sorchakos
Sozirsauos
Sp[a]kos
Spadakos
*Spaldines: From Sulimirski. A king of the Aorsi in 64 BC. Raised an army of 200,000 horsemen to fight in the Bosporan Kingdom's civil war.
Sparophotos
Spharobais
Spithamês
Stormais
Stosarakos
Sturanos
Suarobais
*Synges: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 258-276 AD.
*Tasius: In Sulimirski. King of the Roxolani in 110 BC.
*Teiranes: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 275-279 AD.
*Theothorses/Thothorses: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 275-279 AD. Coins minted sometime from 279-309 AD.
Thirthagos
Thuloganos
Tibês
Tillês
Tiranês, Teiranês, Tiranios
Toumbagos, Toumibagos 
Xaiorsazês
Xartamos, Xarthanos
Xêgodis
Xiamphôkanos
Xobas
Zabagios
Zabandos
Zabargos
*Zosines: In Sulimirski. King of the Siraces in 49 AD. Supported Mithradates VIII against his half-brother Cotys. To save his kingdom, he later sought peace and became a tributary of Rome.
 
Agustí Alemany, 2000, Sources on the Alans: A Critical Compilation, Brill Academic Publishers
Bury, J.B. 1923, History of the Later Roman Empire. Macmillan & Co. Ltd.
Chronica Galla of 452
Eastmond, Antony (1998), Royal Imagery in Medieval Georgia, Penn State Press.
Garland (ed., 2006), Byzantine Women: Varieties of Experience, 800-1200. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Harmatta, J, 1970, Studies in the History and Language of the Sarmatians, Acta antique et archaeologica Tomus XIII.
Herodian, The History of the Roman Empire from the Death of Marcus Aurelius to the Ascension of  Gordian III
Jordanes, The Origins and Deeds of the Goths.
Polyaenus, Stratagems of War. 
Sulimirski, T., 1970,  The Sarmatians, vol. 73 of Ancient Peoples and Places, Praeger Publishers, Inc.
Zgusta, L, 1955, Die Personennamen griechischer Städte der nördlichen Schwarzmeerküste: Die ethnischen Verhältnisse, namentlich das Verhältnis der Skythen und Sarmaten, im Lichte der Namenforschung (Československá akademie ved. Monografie orientálního ústavu 16 ). Praha : Nakladatelstvi československé Akademie Ved.
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/
http://www.wildwinds.com/#

1 comment:

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspar

    ReplyDelete